Book Review: The Robert Langdon books by Dan Brown

roblangdonThe Robert Langdon books by Dan Brown consist of four (to date) fast-paced thriller/suspense novels, featuring fictitious genius Harvard symbology and iconology professor, Robert Langdon. I have read the first three: Angels & Demons, The DaVinci Code, and The Lost Symbol. Each book takes place in a famous city, involves a secret society of a religious or occult nature, and includes a new female counterpart with Langdon.

Angels & Demons is a murder mystery taking place in Vatican City, where Professor Langdon must save the day to stop the murders of Catholic Cardinals inflicted by a mysterious, archaic secret society, called the Illuminati. This is one of the best books in the series.

The DaVinci Code, this time in Paris, focuses on a grand secret kept by the Knights Templar, which the Catholic Church has been trying to eradicate for centuries. This is my favorite book in the series.

Lastly, The Lost Symbol is a scavenger hunt across Washington, D.C., leading to a hidden message left by the Freemasons. In each book, Langdon and his female counterpart encounter a series of clues. Langdon must then use his expertise in interpreting symbols and icons to solve them. The FBI or Secret Service is usually involved, as is some breaking-edge scientific technology: in Angels & Demons, it is an antimatter bomb; in The Lost Symbol, it’s a scientific invention that weighs (therefore proving the existence of) the human soul.

The Robert Langdon books are fun, plot-driven thrillers designed to twist and turn in all the right places. Angels & Demons and The DaVinci Code in particular were a blast. The ending of The Lost Symbol fell flat for me. I couldn’t get through the grisly visuals of Inferno.

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