Book Review: The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin

As a lifelong lover of “Clue” (both the movie and the board game) and, more recently, a big fan of Knives Out, I was surprised I’d never heard of a little 1978 Newbery Medal winner called The Westing Game. I downloaded it on my Kindle and couldn’t stop reading until the end.

The Westing Game follows a colorful cast of characters, all of whom live in a beautiful apartment complex overlooking Lake Michigan, called Sunset Towers. The building overlooks the mansion of a self-made millionaire named Sam Westing. When Westing is (supposedly) found dead at the beginning of the book, the 16 tenants of Sunset Towers are surprised to learn they’ve been named as his heirs. Westing’s will arranges the heirs into 8 teams of 2 who receive $10K cash and a nonsensical set of clues to a mystery they must solve. Whoever solves the mystery first inherits Westing’s entire $200 million fortune and all his assets, including his company.

The heirs competing to solve the clues are a diverse cast of characters ranging in different age groups, ethnicities, income levels and personalities. I found the scenes with the unintentionally bigoted Grace Wexler–a ’70s era “Karen”, if you will–partnered with the cynical Chinese restaurant owner, Mr. Hoo, particularly amusing. There’s also an endearing pair of Greek teen brothers, one in a wheelchair with a sort of palsy; a funny old doorman, a motherly dressmaker, a prestigious Black female judge, two young sisters who are polar opposites, among others. At the heart of the book was how each character started out flawed but changed for the better as a result of their partnership with the other heirs and the experience of the Westing Game. Watching so many unique personalities bouncing off each other was also highly entertaining.

If I have one complaint about the book, it’s the ending. Everything wrapped up too neatly and a the perfect happily-ever-after for every single character didn’t feel realistic or consistent with the overall quirky, at times shadowy, nature of the story. I was let down by the conclusion, but enjoyed the reading experience overall.

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